Negotiating Employment Contracts

At Miller Cohen, P.L.C., we know that many employees walk into a new job without any foundational legal knowledge. They end up signing contracts that compromise their own rights as employees or undercut their value.

We are staunch advocates for the American workers, and we have been so for decades. Our attorneys offer more than 50 years of experience in employment law and employee rights protection. Contact our office to find out how we can help you negotiate the most favorable employment contract possible in your situation.

Key Elements Of A Strong Employment Contract

Having a new job offer is exciting, but do not let that excitement cloud your judgment when signing a contract. The decisions you make early on could influence your professional, personal and financial security later on if your employment relationship changes.

Your professional relationship with your employer: What organization are you truly entering into an employment agreement with? Is it a sole proprietor who provides professional services (i.e., a dentist, a chiropractor, a law firm, etc.)? Are you working for a large corporate entity? It is important to understand who you are actually doing business with.

You also need to consider the nature of your relationship. If you are not consistently working with a company, but they still are asking you to sign a noncompete agreement, you may be limiting your ability to earn income elsewhere with other clients of your own. Perhaps there are specific details about how you can communicate about your job outside of work, like on social media or even with friends and family. You need to fully understand what you can and cannot do, and if you don't like those terms, negotiate.

Your compensation, monetary or otherwise: There are basic compensation issues to consider, like whether or not you are hourly, salaried, full-time, part-time, contracted, etc. Beyond this, you should consider what your new position will involve.

Will you be driving or traveling for work frequently? Will you be incurring personal costs for work supplies? Will you be operating from a home office? These kinds of things may involve added costs that are not reflected in your regular wages. We can help you negotiate maximum compensation that meets all your needs so that your income truly goes into your pocket.

Your rights when your business relationship is terminated: Many businesses employ people "at-will" meaning either party can terminate the employment at any time. Still, there are often expectations about how that relationship ends. People typically "give two weeks notice" but your employment contract may be defined differently.

Ask yourself how much freedom you need or want from your business relationship. Job security is good, but maybe you will end up losing out on other professional opportunities because of your current employment contract. Furthermore, you need to know what you would be entitled to if your employer decides to terminate your relationship. Will you have a solid severance package to fall back on? Will you have continued medical benefits that you and your family will need as you look for work elsewhere?

Powerful Negotiation Strategies That Will Serve Your Interests

Remember that many human resources professionals are there to help you once you are an employee, but they view employees as clients. Ultimately, they serve the business's interests — so you need to protect yours to the same degree. Our team of lawyers can make sure you consider these important factors, and we can assertively pursue the most favorable contract for you.

Contact our office in Detroit to arrange a consultation and work with a premier Michigan employment and labor law firm. We are here to help. Call 313-566-4787 or 800-221-6021, or send us an email today.